De-Stress From Your Tech

May 2020

Our smartphones and tablets allow us to access the latests news and receive real-time responses via email and text. However, this increased connectivity has become a source of stress for many people and a literal pain in the neck for others. Here are a few ways to minimize your gadget stress and still enjoy technology. 

Problem:

Although social media connects us with old and new friends, it may cause us to compare our lives to others. Additionally, unanswered emails and postings that don’t elicit enough responses may cause stress and anxiety.

Solution:

Be grateful. Write down five things, people or experiences that you’re thankful for in your life. A little perspective shift will help you realize that your value as a person is not dependent upon your popularity online. 

Problem:

Juggling multiple applications on our devices may seem like multi-tasking, but in reality, this overstimulation is leaving us less productive and unable to adapt to the slower pace of being offline. Being constantly connected to your gadgets has shown to put heart rates on “high alert”, leading to increased stress and higher cortisol.

Solution:

Set an hour or two aside each day to turn off your smartphone, tablet, laptop, etc. and go for a walk, spend time with family or friends and enjoy non-electronic activities. 

Problem:

Smartphones and tablets are leading to more diagnoses of arthritis and tendinitis, mostly in the elbows, thumbs and neck.

Solution:

To ease the pain, hold your smartphone at chest level and make sure you that you place you tablet on a stand.

Problem:

The LED light from your smartphone, tablet or computer may interfere with your body’s production of melatonin, the hormone vital to have a good night’s sleep.

Solution:

Unplug from your devices before bedtime. You can also install an app which adjusts the night of your computer or personal device to the time of day.

Problem:

Paying more attention to the smartphone has serious consequences. In fact, text messaging while driving creates a crash risk 23 times worse than driving distraction-free because it adverts the driver’s eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, equal to driving the length of a football field blind at 88 km/hour.

Solution:

Put the phone away. No message is important enough to cause an accident. 

 

4 ways to take a break from technology:

  1. Set an alarm to restrict your time in front of the screen of your smartphone or other gadget.
  2. Turn your email push notifications off. Instead, check your email at set times of day.
  3. Turn off your social media when you’re trying to work.
  4. Set boundaries for your work communication. Limiting your availability after work hours will benefit your health and your relationships, and make you more productive at work.

Leave a Comment